Rampage

2018, Uncategorized

Dir. Brad Peyton

Starring: Dwayne Johnson, Naomie Harris, Malin Akerman, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Jake Lacey, Joe Manganiello, and P.J. Byrne

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson is a bonafide movie star. If you look at his CV, it’s pretty much standard action-adventure fare, with the odd dip into action-comedy. The roles that he plays don’t vary much, but still people flock to see the next movie from The Rock. It’s easy to see why, the man oozes charisma. You don’t go to see a Dwayne Johnson movie to see him get stuck into a character, you go to see him kicking ass whilst quipping witticisms. Rampage sees him teaming up with Brad Peyton, the pair having previously worked together on Journey 2 and San Andreas. The film doesn’t deal in subtleties, it knows it has two main attractions, and puts them both front and centre. Ones a giant albino gorilla, the other is a giant bald man.

Rampage is the story of Davis Okoye, played by Dwayne Johnson. A primatologist who works at a sanctuary. It’s here that he has formed a close bond with an albino gorilla named George. When a container falls out of a space shuttle and crash lands on earth, a pathogen inside infects George. The pathogen is a form of genetic editing, and George soon starts growing at an alarming rate, whilst his aggression levels shoot through the roof. He’s not the only animal to be infected though, there’s also a giant flying wolf, and a giant alligator. Throw into the mix a shady government agency which wants to take George for study, and a shady corporation who want to weaponise the pathogen, Davis will have his work cut out as he tries to return George to normal.

Big. Dumb. Fun. That’s exactly what this movie sets out to be, and boy, does it achieve it. It whips by at a frantic pace, barely leaving you time to catch your breath or think too much about it. Which is good because the plot would not stand up to any scrutiny, but there is enough charm here for you to not really care. It’s a bit of a mish mash of different movies, but they sorta work together. It’s bonkers in all the right ways. The prologue is a blend of Gravity and Alien, but instead of an alien it’s a giant rodent killing people off. It then morphs into Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes, before settling on Godzilla. The action is fun, but it’s all held together by another charismatic performance from Dwayne Johnson.

It’s a proper popcorn movie, but does still have the marks of a film which has had major rewrites. It’s a plot where things just happen one after the other without much rhyme or reason. Any excuse to just move onto the next set piece. You’re also introduced to a group of colleagues who work with Davis for the first third of the movie, only to completely disappear and be replaced with characters which fit the plot better. A lot of these characters are given short shrift, although Jeffrey Dean Morgan is good fun. There are also duller moments, the whole sub plot of corporate espionage bores, and the brief introduction to a team of mercenaries which isn’t needed. The film excels when The Rock is on screen doing his thing. The film just needed to keep a tighter focus on his story.

Overall, this is hugely enjoyable romp. It’s pure fluff, but there is enough charm and charisma here to put it a step above similar movies. Gladly this is no Transformers, it’s a fun film which knows where it’s strengths lie.

7/10

Truth Or Dare

2018, Uncategorized

Dir. Jeff Wadlow

Starring: Lucy Hale, Tyler Posey, Violett Beane, Sophia Ali, Landon Liboiron, Hayden Szeto, Nolan Gerard Funk, and Sam Lerner.

2018 has been a fantastic year for horror movies. In the last month we’ve seen both A Quiet Place, and Ghost Stories released. Two incredibly different movies, both of which pushed the genre in exciting directions. Arriving hot on their heels is Truth Or Dare, the latest from Blumhouse Pictures, Jason Blum’s production house which specialises in making low budget horror movies which return huge box office, whilst also pushing the envelope with Whiplash and Get Out. Here he invests in director Jeff Wadlow, best known for directing the middling Kick-Ass sequel. If 2018 has been a great year for horror, Truth Or Dare feels like it should have come out in 2000.

Truth Or Dare follows Lucy Hale’s Amelia, a college student dragged along to Mexico by her friends for Spring Break. On their last night in Mexico she meets a guy called Carter at a bar. Carter invites Olivia and her friends to an abandoned Mission, where they start to play Truth Or Dare. When asked to tell a truth, Carter tells them that he tricked them to come up to the Mission so they would play the game. He tells them that the game is real, and if they don’t play they will die, if they don’t do the dare they will die, and if they don’t tell the truth they will die. They brush it off, but after one of their friends dies when chickening out on a dare, they realise Carter was telling the truth and that they will have to play.

Let’s make one thing clear. I’m probably not the target audience for this movie. This is a film which has got its sights set on 15-18 year olds. The casting alone makes this painfully obvious. Lucy Hale from Pretty Little Liars, Tyler Posey from Teen Wolf, these are some of the hottest stars in American television, all from shows aimed at an audience younger than me. If these are the kind of shows you enjoy, you might have some fun with this movie. If you’re a hardened horror fan, there’s nothing here for you. It moves at a good pace, and the cast do well, but at the end of the day it’s a stupid premise, and the execution is too sincere to have fun with it.

The direction is lacklustre at best. The look and feel of the film is far from cinematic. It’s like binge watching a whole season of The Vampire Diaries, although that comparison is unfair to The Vampire Diaries. There is next to no tension. There are no actual scares; Wadlow is more interested in framing and lighting his good looking cast than actually making the horror in this movie work. It’s laughable at times, but not intentionally. When the kids visit the police station for the third time in a day, you know the movie has no internal logic. I just used the word kids, which is ridiculous, because these actors are clearly much older than the parts they are playing. It’s like all of the bad horror tropes from the 90’s and early 00’s blended into one awful movie.

The biggest disappointment though, is that the film doesn’t embrace the ridiculousness of its premise. The easiest comparison for this movie is Final Destination, which had fun with the way in which it disposed of its cast in increasingly ingenious ways. The deaths in Truth Or Dare are terrible. It’s a strangely bloodless movies, and the deaths are staged so simply, you wish more thought had gone into them, that they’d been smarter. These aren’t characters you are supposed to care about. Most of them you don’t spend enough time with, and the ones you do are pretty terrible people, so their deaths aren’t supposed to hit on an emotional level. Which is fine, but they could have at least made the deaths fun. Alternatively, they could have approached it with a more knowing tone. Used the 90’s horror tropes in a way to make a pastiche of movies like Final Destination.

This film fails pretty much on every level. It’s not scary, it’s not smart, and it’s not funny, at least not intentionally. Save yourself the cost of a cinema ticket, and binge watch a young adult box set, you will get a lot more out of it. Alternatively shove a pen in your eye socket, it will be more fun.

 

3/10

Isle Of Dogs

2018, Uncategorized

Dir. Wes Anderson

Starring: Bryan Cranston, Koyu Rankin, Edward Norton, Bob Balaban, Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum, Kunichi Nomura, Greta Gerwig, Frances McDormand, Akira Ito, and Scarlett Johansson.

It seems almost trite these days to describe yourself as a Wes Anderson fan. The director moved from cult hero into the mainstream with his last movie The Grand Budapest Hotel. The director is almost a genre unto himself now, his films defined by their unique visual style, dead pan delivery of dialogue, and Anderson’s ever expanding troupe of actors. Isle Of Dogs isn’t the first stop-motion animation Anderson has made either, his last one being Fantastic Mr. Fox. For any other director these films would be experiments, or oddities in their CV, but Anderson’s sensibilities lend themselves to the format.

Isle Of Dogs is set in a futuristic, fictionalised version of Japan. An outbreak of dog flu, which is threatening the human population, forces Mayor Kobayashi to exile all the dogs to Trash Island. The place where all the cities garbage goes. The first dog to head over is Spot, the Mayor’s Nephew’s Dog. His Nephew, Atari then steals a plane to fly to Trash Island to rescue his dog, being helped along the way by a pack of alpha dogs.

This movie is a complete joy. I was slightly sceptical going in, I wasn’t sure how much I would get out of the format, or if Anderson would skew too young to hold my attention. I shouldn’t have worried, I was in a safe pair of hands, and the film is captivating and engaging throughout. It feels odd to say, but I believe that this is a film that deserves to be seen on the big screen. The level of detail gone into creating this world is stunning, and the film looks gorgeous. Wes Anderson directs his live action films as if they exist in a dolls house, and this style with way in which depth is used, and the way the camera moves in his film, is an ideal match for stop-motion. If anything it expands Anderson’s vision, allowing him to make a film more epic in scope.

It’s primarily a kids film, but there is a deeper, darker heart to it. It has an emotional core that you’d expect from a film about a boy looking for his lost dog, and whilst the dead pan delivery of Anderson’s cast doesn’t immediately lend itself to cutting straight to the heart, Anderson has crafted a deeply moving film about love, belonging and loyalty. There is darkness here though, which is far from cookie cutter. There are themes of genocide, conformity, and political manipulation, which when paired with the history of Japan brings out a deeper meaning. The kids might not understand it, but there is more going on under the surface of this film than it first appears. It’s this darkness which robs the film of its charm in the final act of the movie. The jokes and humour give way to something more serious, slowing down the pace, and ultimately causing it to drag.

There has been some debate about the film regarding Orientalism. It didn’t bother me at the time of watching, but the more I think about it, there is something there . There is a lot of affectionate homage, and this is a fictionalised Japan which does mean liberties are taken. If there are controversial moments, they hold no intent. There are two creative decisions which grate the most. The first is the fact that unless someone is there to translate, the Japanese language goes unheard and ignored. If they could put subtitles down for signs, they could have put subtitles for the Japanese, it’s a cute creative decision to have other characters translate the news segments, but it turns the other moments the language is used into meaningless nothing. Making it a secondary language. The other element which grated was Greta Gerwig’s foreign exchange student. In a film full of Japanese figures, having the only white one become the leader of the resistance is a bit of a problem.

Isle Of Dog’s is another great movie from Wes Anderson. It’s lovingly made, and looks fantastic. It manages to be both funny and moving, whilst riffing on some more adult themes. The politics might be a bit off, but I don’t believe there was any intent to offend. It’s just a bit blinkered. If you’d like to know more about this check out this article https://www.buzzfeed.com/alisonwillmore/isle-of-dogs-jared-leto-orientalism?utm_term=.uf19MBb7O#.tvvplm36j

7/10

A Quiet Place

2018, Uncategorized

Dir. John Krasinski

Starring: John Krasinski, Emily Blunt, Noah Jupe, and Millicent Simmonds.

From starring in the US version of The Office, to action star, to first time director, it’s seems there’s nothing that John Krasinski can’t do, as he makes directing one of the scariest movies in years look easy. It helps that he can enlist the help of his superstar wife, Emily Blunt to join his cast, but the credit for what has been crafted here should all go to Krasinski. In a character driven horror story with a sci-fi premise. There were rumours before it came out that it might be another surprise Cloverfield movie, it’s not. Cloverfield Paradox could only dream of being this good.

The film is set in a near, post-apocalyptic future. Most of the human race has seemingly been wiped out by what you assume is an alien species, but we’re never told where these monsters have come from. The catch is that the creatures are blind, but have super sensitive hearing which they use to hunt down the humans. John Krasinski plays Lee, a man trying to keep his family safe whilst preparing for the birth of another child with his wife Evelyn, played by Emily Blunt. The only way to stay truly safe though is by staying silent.

A Quiet Place is the most affecting horror movie in years. I have to admit, horror isn’t my favourite genre. I don’t get scared by films, and the modern day horror film is all about long periods of quiet leading to jump scares that I find myself bored. This was not the case with A Quiet Place. Tense, and taught throughout, it functions as a completely engaging thriller that had me on the edge of my seat the whole time. The sci-fi setting gave the film a level of intrigue, and the story itself had an emotional edge which helped elevate the movie above its horror trappings.

There’s a lot to be applauded within this movie, but the element that really makes it work is the sound design. It’s no surprise that a film which is about being as quiet as possible hinges on how well the sound works on the film. The diegetic sound, and its use is incredible. The score is non-intrusive, and Krasinski uses both as a tool to ratchet up the tension. An early scene between Millicent Simmonds Regan and her brother is a great example. Regan is deaf, and uses a hearing aid. During the sign language conversation, Krasinski Cuts between close ups of the two of them, the sound transitioning between what the two of them are hearing with the cuts. There’s a rhythm to this, starting slow, and getting faster, and as the rhythm builds so does the tension. It’s impressive stuff.

The film also works because of the emotional core. The film is crafted around an emotional story about a Dad and his little girl. It’s this story that is the real focus of the film. The investment I had in these characters meant that the more visceral moments really hit home. I physically winced and jumped during moments in this film, not something I normally do. This investment is down to both great story telling, and great acting. John Krasinski does well as the stoic father, and there’s a great soulfulness to his performance, his puppy dog eyes exuding pain and torment, but it’s the two females in the film who really wow. Emily Blunt is fantastic, and is given some of the meatier stuff, and Millicent Simmonds all but steals the film as Regan. It’s a performance which announces the introduction of a future star.

A Quiet Place is one of the best horror movies in recent times. It’s a thrill ride of a film, that will have you on the edge of your seat the whole time. It’s tight and taught, but every moment of the film counts. John Krasinski has hit a home run on his first try, with an intelligent and economic use of cinematic tools. There’s also a nice little message of female empowerment. It starts with Krasinski only taking his son to go get supplies and food, with the two women left at home to do the laundry, this is nicely switched at the end of the film. I’m not a huge horror fan, but I loved this.

9/10

A Wrinkle In Time

2018, Uncategorized

Dir. Ava DuVernay

Starring: Storm Reid, Levi Miller, Deric McCabe, Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Mindy Kaling, Chris Pine, Zach Galifianakis, Michael Peña, and Gugu Mbatha-Raw.

Ava DuVernay is one of the leading lights in American film making. Blazing a trail for both people of colour and for female filmmakers. Her output is usually politically charged, having directed both Selma, and the documentary feature 13th. The later of which won the academy award for best documentary with its exploration of the incarceration of African-American men in America. It’s somewhat of a surprise then that her next feature is a Disney movie primarily aimed at kids. It’s clear though that Ava had a vision for this movie, and that there was a story here that she wanted to tell. She turned down countless other big budget movies, including Black Panther, but with A Wrinkle In Time she became the first African-American woman to helm a film with a budget over $100 million.

A Wrinkle In Time follows the story of Meg, a brilliant Storm Reid, who has become despondent ever since the disappearance of her father, Chris Pine, four years ago. She lives with her Mum and younger adopted brother Charles Wallace. She gets into fights at school, and her grades are starting to slip. We’re told that she used to be a top student, and her brother tells her she’s got more potential than anybody. When her brother introduces her to Mrs Which, Mrs Who and Mrs Whatsit, she finds out that her father had managed to wrinkle space time, allowing him to travel through the universe instantaneously. He’s now been captured by a terrible evil, and it’ll be up to Meg, Charles Wallace and their friend Calvin to rescue him.

The buzz going into this film was mixed. I don’t understand that, I loved this movie. Disney release one of these every year, a big budget movie which isn’t based on an existing franchise, we’ve had The Lone Ranger, and Tomorrowland, and now we’ve got A Wrinkle In Time. They struggle to find their audience, but are some of the most interesting films Disney release. There’s a part in the film where Chris Pine talks about finding the right frequency to wrinkle space time, maybe you had to find the right frequency to really appreciate this movie, because for me it resonates loudly. If you thought that Ava was leaving the politics at the child friendly door, don’t worry, she doesn’t hit you over the head with it, but there’s a message which runs throughout the movie.

The casting alone sends a clear message, Ava is about diversity, and giving opportunities both in front of and behind the camera. The choice of a bi-racial lead isn’t just a token gesture, it becomes the crux of the movie. This is a film about a young girl who doesn’t love herself, doesn’t believe in herself, and that message is reinforced by everyone around her. When Calvin tells her he likes her hair and she says that he doesn’t, it means something. It’s backed up later when she faces the version of herself she wishes she was, and that version has straightened hair. The film is about fighting conformity, and Ava makes it clear that this is of upmost importance to those who are told that the way they naturally look isn’t right, or isn’t beautiful.

The film looks fantastic as well. It’s clear that this is a singular vision of this story. The vistas of the alien planets are gorgeous to behold, and the way the world is built is ingenious. It’s unlike anything DuVernay has done before and she proves herself equal to the task. The rush you get when seeing this world is something I haven’t felt since Avatar. It’s also an incredibly emotional movie. There’s an emotional note which is hit from the very first scene, and it sounds throughout the whole film, getting louder and louder until you can’t hold back the tears. It delivers the most emotionally satisfying climax to a film this year. The cast are all brilliant, especially the three young leads. Storm Reid is a future superstar, and Deric McCabe is immensely enjoyable.

If there’s any faults with the film, it may be in the structure of the story. The first two acts are spent being transported from place to place, with a lot of exposition. It isn’t until the third act that Meg is afforded any agency, which might be a problem for some, but is kind of the point of the film. It’s about a young girl finding her agency. The messages in this film are all beautifully delivered, about loving yourself, your faults, your differences, and building up those around you. It’s about love in the purest form, which may sound saccharine but it’s anything but.

Overall, A Wrinkle In Time is a film not to be missed. If you have a young child, I implore you to take them to see it. They’ll be awed at the world created, but they’ll also learn some important lessons along the way. Ava DuVernay continues to blaze a trail, and I can’t wait to see what she does next, and to see what those who follow her come up with.

9/10

Pacific Rim: Uprising

2018, Uncategorized

Dir. Steven S. DeKnight

Starring: John Boyega, Scott Eastwood, Rinko Kikuchi, Cailee Spaeny, Charlie Day, Burn Gorman, and Tian Jing

 

In 2013, when the first Pacific Rim was released, the film was a breath of fresh air. Guillermo Del Toro showed the bloated Transformers franchise how giant, fighting robots  should be done. I loved the way the film transported me back to being a kid, playing with action figures, and watching Saturday morning television. The first film wasn’t an out and out hit, but it made enough money, especially in China, for a sequel to be green lit. Del Toro returns with a producers credit, but the man calling the shots this time around is Steven S. DeKnight, fresh off of ushering Daredevil to the small screen. John Boyega is also taking a more active role in production as a producer. I went in hoping I was going to get more of what I loved from the first movie, and I left pretty happy.

Pacififc Rim: Uprising is set 10 years after the events of the first movie. The breach which allowed the Kaiju (giant monsters) to enter our world from a parallel universe has been sealed, and the world is attempting to recover now that the threat has gone. Boyega plays Jake Pentecost, the son of Idris Elba’s Stacker Pentecost who sacrificed himself at the end of the first movie. Jake is a drop out from Jaeger academy, a self-professed hustler who steals junk parts to sell to those who are building their own Jaegers (giant robots). When he meets Amara Namani, played by Cailee Spaeny, a young girl who has built her own Jaeger, they draw the attention of local law enforcement and are soon arrested. Facing prison, Jake decides to re-enlist in the Jaeger programme, and train a new batch of recruits, which now includes Namani. He tells his sister Mako (Rinko Kikuchi), and old frenemy Nate (Scott Eastwood), that the programme is waste of time, but soon a new threat emerges.

This film is heaps of big, dumb, fun. Of course, it’s all complete nonsense, that’s part of the point. It’s the simplicity of the plot which allows you to just lean back and enjoy yourself. The world building of the first movie was done so well that you enter this movie believing the world you’re in, and buying into the premise. It’s giant robots fighting giant robots, and giant robots fighting giant monsters. It’s essentially Power Rangers on steroids. There’s a human element to the story too, which drives the plot, and gives the spectacle enough personality that you can connect to the humans inside the robots, and therefore connect to the robots. It’s a similar trick to what Jon Favreau pulled off with Iron Man with the inside the helmet shots of Tony Stark. It’s this balance of spectacle and character which really puts the Transformer franchise to shame.

The film looks fantastic too. The CGI has improved, and by giving the robots distinct looks and traits, you actually know which one is which. DeKnight handles all the action incredibly well, and every time a fight broke out I had a huge grin on my face. The returning cast are all brilliant; Rinko Kikuchi returns as Mako Mori, in a brief but effective turn. We also have the return of Burn Gorman and Charlie Day, as Dr. Herman Gottlieb and Dr. Newton Geiszler, respectively.  These two are great fun whenever they’re on the screen, and their chemistry together is a joy to watch. The newcomers do well too. Cailee Spaeny injects an equal amount of bravado and vulnerability into a character which could have easily been too precocious. Scott Eastwood doesn’t stretch himself too far, but is charismatic and likeable. The real star of course is John Boyega. Oozing charm, and natural star power, he easily own the movie.

The main problem with this movie is that it isn’t quite as good as the first one. It gets off to a wobbly start. The first twenty minutes feels too forced, and I worried that I was going to be annoyed by the new characters. The jokes don’t seem to quite land, and the voice over felt too heavy handed. It also lacks the gravitas of the first film. Boyega’s speech isn’t as good as Elba’s cancelling the apocalypse speech, which the film kind of acknowledges. It also lacked the weight of the first film. When the pilots are moving the Jaegers in the first film it felt laborious, as if there was more of a tangible connection between man and machine. The movement in Uprising felt too light and nimble. The biggest thing of all it misses is the Del Toro touch. When I think of the first movie I think of young Mako in a blue coat walking through the wreckage of her city holding one red shoe. It was such a striking image, and sadly Uprising offers nothing as profound as this.

Uprising is an entertainingly stupid watch. A proper popcorn movie which asks you to leave your brain in the foyer, and just enjoy yourself. It’s a rollercoaster ride. It’s not going to stay with you for long afterwards, and it’s not going to change your life. It’s not even as good as the first film, but the charming cast, and the briskness in which it has been directed all amounts to an enjoyable experience. Another film is teased at the end, and I, for one, would certainly buy a ticket for that.

 

7/10

Ready Player One

2018, Uncategorized

Dir. Steven Spielberg

Starring: Tye Sheridan, Olivia Cooke, Ben Mendelsohn, Hannah John-Kamen, Mark Rylance, Simon Pegg, Lena Waithe, Win Morisaki, and Philip Zhao.

 

Steven Spielberg is back! Back a few short months since The Post was released, and back doing what he does best; making huge, family blockbuster spectacle. Ready Player One is based on the best selling novel by Ernest Cline. I haven’t read that book, but from what I had heard was that it’s a novel full of 80’s pop culture references, that can sometimes feel like just a list of references. Who better to adapt that story then, than Steven Spielberg? Arguably the creator of iconic 80’s pop culture, he has done well to craft this into an engaging tale, whilst avoiding being too self-referential.

Ready Player One is set in the year 2045. The world has become so overcrowded that in the fastest growing city in the world, many people live in a place known as The Stacks. A trailer park where the caravans have been placed on top of each other. Here, we find Tye Sheridan’s Wade Watts, named by his deceased father to sound like a super heros alter ego. Wade lives with his aunt, and a string of her abusive partners. The only place he can go to escape is the OASIS. A virtual reality world where you can be whoever you want to be, and do whatever you want. When the creator of the OASIS, James Halliday played by Mark Rylance, dies, he leaves behind an Easter egg hunt for three hidden keys. Whoever finds all three keys will become the sole owner of the OASIS, and inherit all of Halliday’s wealth. When Wade becomes the first player to find the first key, he becomes the target of Ben Medelsohn and his company IOI, the worlds second largest tech company, who are out to gain control of the OASIS for themselves.

For all of the futuristic technology being used on-screen and behind the camera, this feels like an old-school family blockbuster, and it’s fantastic. This isn’t so much Spielberg reinventing the wheel, but using new technology to show everyone else how this type of film making should be done. It’s brilliant, entertaining, family spectacle. If I wanted to be harsh, I could compare the film to Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over, but this film is so much more than that. It’s so much more than just the sum of its references. Yes, they are great fun, and I think I’d have to see the film another five times to catch even half of them, but the joy is in the way that Spielberg and screenwriters Zak Penn and Ernest Cline use them. There are vast battle sequence which are incredibly Easter egg heavy; you have Freddy Krueger, Masterchiefs, Batman, and many more,  but Spielberg doesn’t linger on them. If anything their addition makes the film seem more realistic, who wouldn’t want to play as Batman in a VR world. It’s a film rooted in nostalgia (the warm feeling you get when the amblin logo shows up at the front of the film), but if you came for the references you’ll leave in love with the characters.

Tye Sheridan deserves a lot of credit for the way he manages to inject so much personality with just a voice over. The first half of the movie takes place mainly in the OASIS, which mean that we see a lot of animated versions of the main characters, and not a lot of the human element. The performance capture work is fantastic, and Sheridan is an engaging and likeable lead. Olivia Cooke, best known for some great work on Bates Motel and Me, Earl, and the Dying Girl, also shines along with Lena Waithe’s H. As the movie progresses, the real world starts to come more into view, which thematically fits the movie perfectly, as the themes of friendship, sacrifice, and living in the now start to come more into focus. The tone is expertly handled by Spielberg, what might suprise some is how funny the movie is, but Spielberg knows how to walk the line between laughs and raising the stakes. As the film enters its final act, you’re really rooting for the main protagonists. It helps that you’ve got Ben Mendelsohn on villain duties, this is the kind of role he could do in his sleep, and he’s perfect here as the head of a villainous company which has shades of the original RoboCop movie.

Zak Penn does incredibly well adaptating the book. In the novel there’s a task where Wade enters a Monty Python movie, where he can win the task by quoting the movie off by heart. A fun idea, but not very cinematic. Here, Penn has them enter a different movie (I won’t spoil which one), a movie which one of the characters hasn’t seen. The joy here is that the audience know the rules of this movie, and it becomes increasingly funny as the character does all the wrong things. It’s a scene which garnered the biggest laughs of the film, testament to how well it’s been adapted. If the novel has been accused of just being a list of references, I didn’t feel that here. This is a film with a lot of heart, thanks to great lead performances, and some welcome supporting performances from Mark Rylance and Simon Pegg. The movie looks great, and is packed with toe-tapping 80’s tunes. I saw the film in 3D and it looked amazing. Maybe, even the act of putting on your 3D glasses, similar to Wade putting on his VR headset, made the film even more immersive.

After mis-steps with The BFG and Tin Tin, Spielberg delivers one of his best family blockbusters, retaking his throne as the king of family friendly entertainment. This film is a blast from start to finish. Containing plenty of action, laughs, and heart, it uses its futuristic set-up to deliver some old-school thrills. You’ll want to go straight back into the cinema after it’s finished. If not to catch some more Easter eggs, than to spend some more time in this world, and with these characters.

9/10